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CSPAN
Feb 2, 2013 9:00am EST
demographics and birthrates could cause the u.s. to lose its place as a world leader sunday night at 9 eastern on "after words" on c-span2. and look for more online. like us on facebook. >> next on booktv, paul dickson presents a collection of words popularized by american presidents including warren g. harding's founding fathers invoked during his presidential campaign, theodore roosevelt's use of the word muckraker in a speech critical of specific journalists, and military industrial complex delivered by president eisenhower during his final presidential address to the american public in 1961. this is a little under an hour. [applause] >> thank you very much. i've been playing around with words for a long time, and i think when i was a kid, one of my -- i wasn't that athletic, and i wasn't that, you know, smart in various ways, but i could always go home and memorize a couple words, so i would learn words like apathetic and things like that. you know, for a third grader, it was a lot of fun. and as i got to be an older person, i got really fascinated by doing some tricks with words. one of m
CSPAN
Feb 25, 2013 1:40am EST
that it doesn't do anything the u.s. doesn't like or one which apparently on the surface has more love for it. at the same time it's disengaged. it's not fair for ambassador rice. her engagement is where it should be. she's living day and night in the accident occurty council that's where she should be. i think that those probably warfare criticism during the first two to three years of the first barack obama term. >> host: when has the u.s. sought u.n. legitimacy? >> guest: most of the time as a per let to actions that it was planning on taking anyway. so in iraq, we saw legitimacy for something the entire world knew we were going do no matter what. i would say that the u.s. seeks a less contentious program which is -- [inaudible] peace keeping operations in places in the world where we can't operate others and put our people at risk. and yet, both for reasons of our interest and values and ideals. we think it would be a good idea if somebody on the ground to maintain amenable oil. i think we see u.s. legitimacy for purpose where our -- >> host: and you write in the book living with the u.n.
CSPAN
Feb 18, 2013 8:30pm EST
prohibiting the use of coffee and coca-cola -- cola in the world. this is a little over an hour as they discuss the invitation of its use worldwide. >> could please turn on that. thank you. we are going to be talking about coffee, and cola and the ingredients in cola. his latest book examines a series of highly addictive substances that have caused many deaths through much profit and how they make their way into the united states and what the u.s. government's role has been in ensuring that they come into this country. this evening, we are pleased to be joined by two drug policy experts as well. without further ado, i would like to hand it over to the panel. [applause] >> thank you so much for coming out here. i am so excited. it is great to be here in new york. i'm going to start off by talking about my book, and then we will go into what focuses this week and what is going on with the u.n. that basically prohibits this around the world. back in 2004 and 2005, i did a book about marijuana. it wasn't about how to smoke weed, but an educational book about how they might talk to t
CSPAN
Feb 18, 2013 7:00am EST
postevent features. and to get us started i want to reduce the mastermind of today's event, bernard curtis. burnet is, i learned today, one of four curators of photography in the prints and photographs division. i'm sure they are all here. it is my pleasure to turn it over to berna curtis. let's give her a and. -- in a hand. [applause] >> thank you very much, john. i have to say that we are all in this together. i'm not the mastermind. today, we have brigitte freed was the winner of the photographer whose work is featured in the book, "this is the day: the march on washington," which we are celebrating. and we have the distinguished dr. michael eric dyson, and we have paul farber. all of them here with us for a special kind of conversation, which is how we build this. i will tell you a little bit about each individual quickly. because time is of the essence. and i'd like to tell you that brigitte freed was formally brigitte pflueger, and she met leonard freed in rome in 1956. they married a year later in amsterdam where they lived, deciding to leave for life in the united states in 1963,
CSPAN
Feb 6, 2013 8:00pm EST
thought was good for us all. i am honored to be here with american enterprise institute and for me it's like coming to the mac and the promised land and certainly we recognize the great contributions that the american enterprise is given over many years in helping us with the development of policy and understanding of what's taking place particularly here in washington d. c., so thanks for the invitation to come here and speak. we are going to talk about health care today and from a utah perspective, my view of the world when it comes to health care. it's a complicated topic and it's certainly an important topic and i know health care has been on the lips of many, the watercooler topic that it may be. i have heard the story of the four country surgeons in utah talking about health care issue and they got into the conversation of who is the easiest person to operate on? and the one doctor says i can tell you the easiest people to operate on a really mathematicians. when asked why mathematicians come to when you open them up and take them apart all of their parts are numbered so it's ve
CSPAN
Feb 21, 2013 5:00pm EST
access like over here. i know this is hard to see with the light, the unite the will to use our copies that we have been back afterwards. .. they also would benefit from having their revenue source to do a lot more, so this is a wonderful that you can use. let's see, this is another prop that shows carbon energy efficiency spending relative to the carbon intensity that would show you might be spending a bit of money on energy efficiency but you have the carbon intensive energy sources in your state. what are the spaces that fall into that particular squadron, and that might be other candidates for energy efficiency programs. all right with. moving along. this is an example of how you have the comparison interface that the tool allows you to do. this is an interactive feature. so, for example, you hear that the epa is moving forward on greenhouse gases and that it's very receptive to the alternative means of achieving compliance. what would you want to do? with the market base things that you want to do? this particular tool would allow you to look at for example the benefits of
CSPAN
Feb 27, 2013 7:30am EST
would have thought when some of us voted for just a common market all those years ago that the eu would now be interfering potentially and what benefits we should be paying two romanians and bulgarians before they have made any occupation to our society? is it any wonder people feel disillusioned and callous? but isn't the good news is, who is more likely to vote to give people a genuine choice of a referendum, a liberal or a conservative or eastland? >> well, i'm delighted by my honorable friend managed to slip the point in at the end. i won't urge any i will friends to make their way to support the reelection and the campaign. but the point, the point that he makes is very important, which is we need to look through every aspect of how we welcome people to our country, and make sure why we must to be fair, we must not be a soft touch. so i am making sure we look at our health service, we look at housing, we look at benefits. with that illegally, we look at all other things and make sure proper and tough controls of people who want to come and live here. >> the treasury was required to
CSPAN
Feb 27, 2013 8:00pm EST
there in that video this morning. they have the capability to be held and used to produce rapid fire. i asked a question on month ago, what purpose does serve in civilians hands are on the street. i haven't received an answer yet but they did blurt the second amendment. 2nd amendment. it wasn't about the 2nd amendment. i defend the second amendment. and i want to see that upheld and regulated and it hasn't been. when that was written on most 300 years ago we didn't have the weapons we have today in the technology. they had muskets and cannons. i think it was 1934 when the ban was put on machine guns, the regulation. we haven't had a mass killing with a machine gun since. i feel these so-called assault weapons that have certain characteristics should fall in that category and be banned. >> thank you mr. heslin, thank you very much. at one point steinbeck had to write a small paragraph that said basically, people are asking what happened. this was after his wife joined him in seattle and when he says we get is not charlie and john. and somebody must have said tim hey where's charlie? yes disapp
CSPAN
Feb 18, 2013 8:30am EST
attempts to prohibit the use of coffee and coca in the u.s. and around the world. mr. cortes describes secret deals made by top u.s. anti-drug official harry answer linger pushing to banco ca's use worldwide. this is a little over an hour. >> okay. um, and so tonight we are pleased to welcome ricardo cortes to discuss his latest book, "a secret history of coffee, coe that and cola: a tale of coffee, coca-cola, caffeine, secret formulas, special flavors, special favors and a future of prohibition." cortes is the creator and illustrator of a series of subversive books for all ages, for postally all ages about such things as marijuana, bombing and the jamaican bobsled team. his latest book examines a series of highly addictive substances that have caused many deaths and fueled much, much profit in this how they make their way into the u.s. and what the u.s. government's role has been in insuring that they come into this country, all right? and this evening we are pleased to be joined by two drug policy experts as well. its fellow sanho tree and colette that youngers. and without further a
CSPAN
Feb 8, 2013 7:00pm EST
into questions that is going on with our activists all over the country today. why don't you pick us off. >> sure. good morning, everyone. what an amazing energy in this room come as a thank you for being part of it and giving us the opportunity to share comments with you. i really think it is actually simpler then everyone makes the scene. i have never ever met a member of congress, house or senate, that did not want to make our country healthier, better, stronger for the future. we can figure out a way to get there. that is what this is about. putting the country first and doing what are country does every day, working together to get the job done. with this audience you will pull your members of congress and encourage them to join this group and to start solving the problems of the greatest nation in the world. gabba suing think you for having a survey. [applause] >> good morning. i represent connecticut's fourth congressional district. this system might think, one of the most diverse congressional districts in the country. i have the town's of greenwich where hedge fund managers and corporate
CSPAN
Feb 23, 2013 4:30pm EST
on book tv computer andres talks about a long history of smuggling in the u.s., which prior to the revolutionary war was driven by a desire to grow domestic industries and bypass paying import taxes to the british. it is about an hour and a half. >> good afternoon and welcome to the watson institute for international studies. the discussion of peter and raises new book, smuggler nation, hal illicit trade made america. housekeeping, i have to mention some things. the way we're going to run this is as follows. i will do a brief and perfunctory introduction. and peter is going to get up and talk briefly about the book is obviously most of you have not read the book. this will become a stanley one-way conversation. after this will invite richard and james to say their piece on the book, and hopefully we can get stuck into a good discussion of smuggler nation and its aspects. at that point, we will open it up for q&a. you will see it is one fix microphone, and another mobile microphone for this side of the house. if you wish to join the q&a, please, if you're on this side get up
CSPAN
Feb 4, 2013 8:30am EST
: will the word "television" still be in use? >> guest: probably old people like me will still be using the word "television." and i think displays will still have a prominent role in the home for communicating content and information. >> host: joe taylor, chairman and president of panasonic in north america, this is "the communicators" on c-span. "the communicators" is on location at ces international 2013, the technology trade show. more programming next week. >> just ahead, president obama speaks at a ceremony honoring recipients of this year's national medals for science, technology and innovation. after that we're live with a national health policy conference with industry leaders and representatives of government who will discuss what to expect in health care policy this year. and later more live coverage as former first lady laura bush speaks at the susan g. komen for the cure's global women's cancer summit. >> at age 65 she was the oldest first lady when her husband became president, but she never set foot in washington. her husband, benjamin harrison, died just one month after his inaug
CSPAN
Feb 19, 2013 9:00am EST
the tax code which everybody wants us to do. but also we have used a small percentage of that money to reduce the deficit. so it doesn't place too much burden on the operating structure of the country. >> so who is the one person in the white house and one person and the republican leadership who is most committed to making the tough choice because i think the one person in the white house is most authentically -- authentically committed to making is the president. i've met with him several times. i believe that he's willing to make these cuts in the entitlement programs that we have to make. that doesn't mean i don't want to continue to push them outside of his comfort zone to go a little further than you might want to go otherwise, but i think we're going to have to if we get a deal with republicans but again we'll have to push the republicans in order to do the tax reform, allows us to reduce the deficit in the same manner. >> how do you push a president? >> you know, the way i've done it is always candidly, open with him, not agree but tell them exactly what you think and why. t
CSPAN
Feb 2, 2013 7:00am EST
to the federal government used to pay unemployment benefits to nevadans who are out of work. this will stabilize the rate paid by businesses and insure that the entire amount is paid off by 2016. [applause] >> we will also work on project neon, a project that will meet the most critical transportation needs of southern nevada. project neon is perhaps the largest public works project in nevada since the construction of hoover dam. [applause] it will completely modernize the infrastructure of the grid and insure that our commute is safer and more efficient for decades to come. [applause] nevada must continue to lead in other ways, and no opportunity is as rich with promise as our primary industry, gaming. nevada was the first state to legalize and regulate online gaming. in the absence of federal action on this issue, nevada must continue to lead. the nevada gaming control board will bring legislation to eliminate nevada's statutory barriers to interstate online poker and ask for authority to enter into interstate agreements. nevada has always been the gold standard of both gaming regulation and o
CSPAN
Feb 19, 2013 5:00pm EST
of focus enables us to have that perspective in a different way than if we were running a television network for if we were focusing on a larger more diverse demographic. >> for no wonder if you could address the opportunities you see on the horizon in engaging in a public audience is whether it is the next iteration of crowd sourcing or whatever it is, what better way is you see to engage the audience in ways that intersect in the to double lines that you've described that have impact both on your social consequence as well as your sustainability but it begins with ways to engage them in the journalism. estimate what we are trying to do from the editorial perspective is go to their readers rather than create new products that ask them to come to us. so being very much engaged in a conversation particularly on twitter and some extent facebook is an important strategic priority for what we are doing. we are also experimenting with ideas of trying to use the technology to engage in those dialogues in a way that hasn't been possible something like google hangout there's about 25 folks i
CSPAN
Feb 20, 2013 12:00pm EST
use only might accumulated leave time for this birth, and i made arrangements to have the child adopted at birth. pregnancy was immoral and administrative grounds for discharge, and that was that. so susan was sent back to the west coast where she was represented by the aclu of the state of washington. they managed to stay or discard -- to stay for discharge month by month. she lost in district court. she lost in the ninth circuit, but with an excellent defense. [laughter] the supreme court took her case, and they then -- and then the solicitor general been the dean of the first law school i attended, he saw a real damage potential for the government in susan's case. so he convened the military brass and he said, that rule about pregnancy being an automatic grounds for discharge, that's not right for our time. you should immediately wave the captain's discharge and then change the regulation. for the future. and that's what happened. now, the law students know what that meant for our case. the government had given susan everything she was asking for, so the government then immed
CSPAN
Feb 4, 2013 11:00pm EST
have come back to the market. can you tell us a little bit more about the structural economic reforms. particularly repairing the banking system, which i feel is the exemption of growth. >> yes, two years ago when the administration was elected, it actually lasted 250,000 jobs for the two years prior to that. reputation is in shreds around the world. our banks are dysfunctional. there is a complete sense of hopelessness and despair and disillusionment. now, gordon was elected with a very keen mind. we have a strategy and a plan that works. the banks are being recapitalize and restructured and have been back in the market as this program began in 2013. there are double-digit figures and our people have had to take really serious challenges. his government made really serious decisions or if it is an example of the government works and understands the patience of people, putting up with these changes in the greater picture of things. now, we expect to do better. but we cannot do without the collaboration of the committee of the colleagues in order to do that in 2013, and example of the
CSPAN
Feb 21, 2013 11:00pm EST
and our great leader, tom vilsack has an opportunity to share with us visions for were going in the second term. it seems like a sequester come to sequester come to sequester and that certainly does weigh heavily on our shoulders, but nevertheless come were applied rumor going to do some incredibly great things in the second turned and i'm sure he's very excited to share that with you. i also want to recognize that we have a lot of young people in the audience from the outlook forum student diversity program, now in its seventh year. 20 undergraduates and for the first time, 10 graduate students are here to gain insights into food monoculture. so be sure to seek them out during the breaks. congratulate them for being here, mentor them over the course of a couple of days. that would be great. i know how these people are because i have an alumnus of this program who works in my office and these are the people who are going to beat american agriculture in the future. many thanks to our program partner, university of maryland eastern shore and the sponsors to make this program possible, chs, f
CSPAN
Feb 9, 2013 12:45pm EST
of the task" with co-author mark bowden. former commander of u.s. forces recounts the major turning point in his thirty-four year military career which ended in 2010. this is about an hour. [applause] >> thank you very much, thanks for coming out. wonderful opportunity, the gentleman sitting next to me is kind of a big deal. for anyone who is -- pays attention to american foreign policy and military affairs you know that ever since the attacks on this country on 9/11 the united states has had to evolve militarily and in the intelligence community to meet the challenge of this new enemy and more than anyone i can think of, general mcchrystal has been responsible for shaping the evolution and developing what i call the targeting engine which is what we adopted as the primary method of defending the country. thank you for being here, great to see you. >> thanks for two kind introduction. i thought of you as a nonfiction writer but you have gone into fiction now. >> you were the commander of special operations in iraq and afghanistan and there have been a rapid evolution. i am familiar from w
CSPAN
Feb 17, 2013 1:00pm EST
. >> host: so ambassador ahmed, do locals in afghanistan, different tribes, see the u.s. as attacking their personal tribe or see their own afghanistan government? >> guest: peter, you have now raised a very important question. you raised the third actor. so you have the united states, you have the tribes, and you now rates the idea of the central government as a third person. you have a triangle and that is the complexity that is often overlooked. the central government has its open relationship with its own periphery, and very often it's a troubled one. go to the middle east, not africa, central asia, and you'll find this pattern. if the central government is tolerant and open and inclusive and gives it citizens the rights they deserve, to freedom to education, health, job opportunities, there's no problem. if it suppresses and suppresses and prewitt brailizes its own population you have problem. whether it's iraq and saddam hussein or sirral and brutalization of the people you. see the same pat turn. gadhafi, the eastern tribes, the benghazi people. so the pattern exists throughout
CSPAN
Feb 7, 2013 8:00pm EST
. testified about the attack thon u.s. consulate in benghazi, libarch that killed ambassador stevens and three other americans. the pentagon never received the request from the state academy for security, and did not have the resources to get support on the ground in time to thwart the attackers. leon panetta is stepping down. this hearing is four hours and 15 minutes. [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> good morning, everybody. today the committee welcomes secretary of defense, leon panetta, and the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff, general martin dempsey. to testify about the department of defense's response the deadly terrorist attack on the u.s. temporary mission facility in benghazi, libya, last year. and the findings of its internal review following that attack, including lessons learned from benghazi. we will be receiving testimony next tuesday morning on the impact of sequestration and/or a full-year continuing resolution on the department of defense witnesses. there will be department secretary of defense, the comp driller and the joint chiefs of staff. i hope
CSPAN
Feb 7, 2013 9:00am EST
and it was time for us to become a colony again. they were winning that war, marching up the eastern seaboard destroys city after city, destroyed washington, d.c., burned down the white house. next stop, baltimore but as they came into the chesapeake bay, the armada of ships, warships a source of the eye could see, it was looking grim. fort mchenry standing right there. general armistead who was in charge of fort mchenry had a large american flag commission to fly in front of the fort. the admiral in charge of the british fleet was offended and said take that flag down. you have until dusk until you take that flag and but if you don't we will reduce you to ashes. there was a young amateur poet on board by the name of francis scott key, sent by president madison to try to obtain the release of an american physician who was being held captive. he overheard the british plans they were not going to let them off the ship. he mourned as dusk approached. he more for his fledgling young nation. and as the sun set, then bartman's, missiles, so much debris, he strained trying to see was the flag still
CSPAN
Feb 7, 2013 12:00pm EST
as a u.s. senator from massachusetts. mr. president, i am proud to join my colleagues today in support of the violence against women act of 2013. i do so not just as a senator but as a mother of two daughters. this critical legislation has been held up for far too long, and it's past time for reauthorization. we have a serious responsibility to ensure that women and families are protected. the rates of violence and abuse in our country are astounding and totally unacceptable. according to a 2010c.d.c. study, domestic violence affects more than 12 million people each year. across the united states, 15 1/2 million children lives in homes in which domestic violence has occurred. and in my home state of north carolina alone, 73 women and children are killed on average every year because of domestic violence. let me say that number one more time. 73 women and children are killed every year due to domestic violence. these are alarming statistics, and we must act now to address them. since 1994, vawa programs, and in particular the stop program, that provides grants for services, training, of
CSPAN
Feb 10, 2013 3:15pm EST
the guinness world record for most secret decoder rings used in one place. that is the nerdiest thing you can do with your time ever. we had john from day -- daily show helped us. and nothing is better except being in a book store on a friday night. so i pity all of us, really, all of us. i want to say the most important thing of all, it will be the most important thing i'll say all night, and thank you. everything i say after that will be straight downtown hill, and some of the specific thank yous to the end. we're here too talk about "fifth assassin." and people ask me where the book came from. no one gets crazeyear e-mail than me. no one gets more proof that abraham lincoln is gay than me. the last time i was at this store for the inner circle, someone brought me the holy grail, okay? is that guy here? is the -- i have to ask first. not here? then let's talk about him. here's what happens. i'm not dish promise you this is true. i was standing right of the and he comes top me early and says, brad, you want to see he holy grail? and he ah has crazy eyes and i'm like, you brought the holy gra
CSPAN
Feb 10, 2013 7:30pm EST
is moving in in strange ways. it used to be said that books were written for the general reader. now they're written by the general reader. .. eager to join in dialogue about where we as a nation find ourselves in this drive towards freedom and it seems particularly fitting that we would have this conversation today, the day after the nation paused its daily business to pay tribute to reverend martin luther king, jr.'s life and legacy. and it seems fitting that we would have this conversation the day after the nation's first black president was sworn in for his second term. i know much of the nation has already moved on, and president obama's rhetoric about the promise of america, life, liberty, justice, equality for all has already been forgotten by many, and i know that many people in america will not think of dr. king again until his holiday rolls around again next year. but i would like to us to pause to night and think more deeply about the meaning of dr. king's life and his legacy and what it has to teach the nation's present. it seems important to do that given that this year marks
CSPAN
Feb 21, 2013 12:00pm EST
complex issue, because of the definition of taxes, penalties and related issues. >> yeah, i think using the term subsidy by its nature, it makes people nervous. subsidy seems have sort of a connotation use in recent years of something untoward. i guess the way i would look at it, i hear your question as a bit of a philosophical question, and less of a nuts and bolts question. i think philosophically, there is fairly broad agreement that you subsidize things that have a social benefit. that they have a benefit that goes beyond the individual and it's not decision reflected in the marketplace. and so i think that you have to look at it that way, if something is not being valued that would make, you know, society better, then you have to come up with some way of evaluating it. whether tax is one way of doing that. i think as far as a market mechanism, it is the way we have tended to look at subsidy as sort of the lubricant to allow these new technologies to find their footing in the marketplace. they do, without a doubt. we have our technology curve and i can show you the map of all of our
CSPAN
Feb 22, 2013 9:00am EST
and equipping that we did of nonlethal assistance to the nonviolent opposition allowed us -- has allowed us over the last year to really broaden the u.s. knowledge of what's going on in syria, who the key players are. and i think if you end up, if you're getting close to a circumstance where there might be either rationalized or let's call it a highly decentralized result to the conflict, then you really want to know 100 people. you don't want to be dependent on just walking a white horse down main street at damascus and hoping that some leader jumps on and we go. so this is the kind of sort of ground, foundation building that you have to undertake and that we've done. >> could you tell us something a little more specific about how you're actually doing that? do you know 100 people in aleppo? you've got a team of 200. are you able to get people on the ground, work with others? >> sirree is a really good challenge, because you have to work out of a third country, which has its own for distinct feelings about what's going on inside of syria and what it might mean to them. so we're working -- up un
CSPAN
Feb 10, 2013 5:00pm EST
just single, contact to us. thank you very much. [applause] >> in the early-morning hours of august at akkad, following negotiations and promises iraq's dictator, saddam hussein not to use force, a powerful iraqi army invaded it stressed and much weaker neighbor, kuwait. within three days, 120,000 iraqi troops with 850 tanks have poured into kuwait and moved south to threaten saudi arabia. >> in my direction, elements of the 82nd airborne division as well as key units are juicy keen of no one friend or fellow and no one should underestimate our determination to confront aggression. >> our objectives in the persian gulf are clear. our goal is to find and familiar. iraq must withdraw from kuwait completely, immediately and without conditions. [applause] these goals are not ours alone. they've been endorsed by the united nations security council five times in as many weeks. most countries share our concern for principal and many have a state in the stability of the persian gulf. this is not a saddam hussein would have it, the united states against iraq. it is iraq against the world. >>
CSPAN
Feb 12, 2013 9:00am EST
structures in europe and in the u.s. but there's another reason. the reason is, that has been said this morning, of course, economy is not always and only about data, but it's also about hegemony. it's a fight about ideas and the question is what kind of ideas? give you one little example. when we are talking about the europe crisis in europe, conservatives have reached one thing. the euro crisis on their view, and that is agreed on by many politicians and also by the public, the euro crisis is a crisis and has its reasons, in the public deficit. this is only one small part that they succeeded in bringing this view through, and it's also, that has consequences of course for economic policies. and, therefore, it's very important, and, of course, american economic debate has huge influence on european debates. it's very important that we are talking together, that we are working together and that we are trying to make a more differentiated approach on what and how to make policies engage the crisis. and that is, that is important because, and let me say that, because this room is ful
CSPAN
Feb 22, 2013 7:00pm EST
that the moment the nomination would start the next day. >> the big surprise to us was our greatest fear the super pac adds that the really unprepared. and to this day, i am confused as to why that didn't happen. if i am running a pact not affiliated with the candidate nac the republican side, i'm saying i'd better provide some air cover because the president is getting a free pass. >> this is proof that there was no coordination. we always unterberg was the calvary in april? >> double impact of the super pac is a fascinating subject. >> it's like any new development, like tanks or machine guns. >> what worked and didn't work. >> what we discovered, surprise and disappointment was there was some superb super pacs for a long time, but that the impact they had was not from voters, was not what we would expect it to have. and you can analyze this and ask why this was. the most obvious answer would be because it was not coordinated with the campaign. e-learning campaign one-to-one when you coordinate with the campaign, you roll it out with your prowess in your whole campaign apparatus. they couldn't d
CSPAN
Feb 26, 2013 9:00am EST
the u.s. patent office issued patent number 46,454. i will give you a pop quiz. it was simply labeled john deere plow. but the implement sketched out on the page could just as easily been labeled, as some historians have named it, one of the most important inventions in american history. they called it the plow that broke the plains, and it did. by replacing cast-iron with smooth steel, john deere's innovation opened up huge new swaths of land for cultivation. it made it possible for towns like aberdeen south dakota my hometown to exist. before it killing and maker took a grown man a full 24 hours. after it, it took as little as five. and every pile of soil overturned upended another assumption about what the land could produce. that, to my mind, has been the story, not just of agricultural success, but of national success. and, indeed, of global progress. this kind of game changing innovation has enabled us to leap ahead, to break the points, to increase harvest, and to frankly, feed the whole world. sometimes innovations come from the most advanced science, other times they
CSPAN
Feb 28, 2013 9:00am EST
mistreatment, the employer can decide to use e-verify against the worker. when employers can easily abuse some workers of all american workplace suffer. e-verify employers routinely violate the program rules, and that hurts workers but the only way a worker knows that he has in e-verify period is if an employer tells them. e-verify is a program that space on agreement between the employer and the government. and workers are really just stuck on the sidelines, even though they have the most to lose from an era. for instance, 42% workers say that they are not notified by the employer of an e-verify error. and if a worker doesn't know that an error exist, and no way to correct it. is vital important that the worker know about errors in the records because errors can lead to workers getting fired, through a final nonconfirmation but because the likelihood of your citizens is at risk even seemingly small error rates really matter. using uscis own statistics, only 50,000 is workers experience and be verify air lest you. that's with 93% of employers not using the program. outdated examples of e-verif
CSPAN
Feb 7, 2013 11:00pm EST
heightened security risk. and i think it's time for us to do a check on whether or not we should in fact be relying on in that local militia were contractors. >> senator, let me just commend you for the work you've been doing with regards to these kind of contract and the quality of individuals that are involved. .. to do what is inherit a government function. it's almost like a hit brick wall every i time talk about this. why is it it has to be a contract function. why can't we use the best trained military in the world to protect our most valued assets in our most dangerous places? >> i mean, i think the reality just speaking with regards to my old agency we are deployed in so many areas you can't expect the military to pop up there and provide that kind of protection. they have to get security on side and get from the very best people they can contract with. that's become the reality we're dealing with. >> because the need to integrate to the community and therefore if you have military it stands out. i can see that particularly under the intelligence agency. for embassies, it
CSPAN
Feb 9, 2013 9:00am EST
and historian michael beschloss. .. and a now, it starts and moves forward and cuts us off from any access to african history, which was not what woodson in tended. and so, we obviously owe the peopleof our higher to and so we obviously of the who d those who are descended from those people who worked for 246 years for nothing. we owed them something for that, but we owe them the story of themselves. we have been asked to expect that people can survive in good, sound psychological health, on ashes and obliterated history. when i was a child in richmond, virginia, weiss to have this phrase that we used all the time. from here to timbuktu. but, nobody knew what timbucktoo was. nobody knew the meaning of the word. didn't know where it was and didn't even know it was a place. timbucktoo of course was a crossroads of commerce but it was also a site the site of one of the world's first universities of san kora which was built before the blackmore's ilk the first university in spain at sala make a and 7-eleven a.d.. and so still in timbuktu you have all of these manuscripts written between five a
CSPAN
Feb 15, 2013 5:00pm EST
the country and around the world and it will influence policy in a way that makes sense that most of us tend to agree with. it would be different around the edges but everyone in the room agrees that it needs to be done. that's what i'm getting at. what can you tell us about that? >> i think that. one of the as the white house chief of staff i met with both world leaders and heads of major interest groups in the country. the way you carry yourself in that position as where the gravitas comes from. i feel like in the business dealings that i've had it is building a trust. it's about having her credibility and speaking clearly and saying what you think. i have done more than my share of public speaking and appearances and i'm not afraid of taking issues public and expressing complicated ideas people can understand. i'm not sure how to put a specific question behind gravitas but i think the career path i've had very few people leave the role of the staff and become a member of the cabinet. i've had a path that is not the normal and that lends itself out. >> i wish you well because -- >> do you
CSPAN
Feb 18, 2013 7:00pm EST
in and impose the strategy he wants to with the full agreement of the u.s. government. this has all been very exquisitely coordinated. >> now jonathancast, katz, who lived in haiti, talks about the work to rebuild the country. it's 45 minutes. >> hello. thank you for the introduction. this is very cool. this is my first book, so if i look like i'm really not accustomed to this, it's because i'm really not accustomed to this. so the book is called "the big truck that went by." and there's a spoiler in the subtitle. how the world came to save haiti and left behind a disaster, i'm going to read to you a little bit about it and talk about it, and then i hope that we have a good discussion as this topic usually provokes. so i'm going to start by reading from chapter one, the end. before i do i'm going to give myself some water. this brand of water is in the book. had i known that i would have picked that section. i can try to look for it in a little bit. these are actually delivered to haiti after the earthquake by the u.s. military. it's called fiji water for a reason. it comes from fiji, which i
CSPAN
Feb 3, 2013 12:00pm EST
and a now, it starts and moves forward and cuts us off from any access to african history, which was not what woodson in tended. and so, we obviously owe the value of our higher to those people who suffered so much and those who are descended from those people who worked for 246 years for nothing. we owed them something for that, but we owe them the story of themselves. we have been asked to expect that people can survive in good, sound psychological health, on ashes and obliterated history. when i was a child in richmond, virginia, weiss to have this phrase that we used all the time. from here to timbuktu. but, nobody knew what timbucktoo was. nobody knew the meaning of the word. didn't know where it was and didn't even know it was a place. timbucktoo of course was a crossroads of commerce but it was also a site the site of one of the world's first universities of san kora which was built before the blackmore's ilk the first university in spain at sala make a and 7-eleven a.d.. and so still in timbuktu you have all of these manuscripts written between five a.d. and 15 a.d., lite
CSPAN
Feb 25, 2013 5:00pm EST
republicans will finally allow a vote on the nomination of robert bacharach to the u.s. court of appeals for the tenth circuit. because of this filibuster, something that stopped robert bacharach way last year, a man who came out of the senate judiciary committee unanimously, all democrats, all republicans voting for him, the people of oklahoma, colorado, kansas, new mexico, utah and wyoming have been needlessly denied his services as a tenth circuit judge for seven months. now, the judicial vacancies have again risen to almost 90. we have dozens of judges that get blocked for month after month after month, and then the republicans finally allow a vote on it, it passed with 90 votes or 95 votes or 100 votes, but every time that happens, the federal courts have diminished. every time that's happened, aside from the fact that the people of america wonder what in heaven's name we're doing in this body, anything as foolish as that, but the courts, the federal courts are supposed to be so impartial and outside of politics, they appear to be mixed up in politics. how does anybody, from any of
CSPAN
Feb 4, 2013 8:30pm EST
reconstruction, john sopko delivered a report on you for spending so far show in the u.s. government spent over $7 million on a largely unused building. his remarks from the center for strategic and international studies in washington d.c. rfid the minutes. [inaudible conversations] >> good morning. thanks for coming today. my name name is robert laman and director of the program in crisis conflict and cooperation here at csis. welcome. it is my pleasure today to be hosting john sopko who is the special inspector general for afghanistan reconstruction known by the acronym sigar. mr. sopko has been a state and federal prosecutor. he has been congressional counsel, senior federal government adviser. he has been the chief counsel for oversight and investigation for the house committee on energy and commerce and has also been on the chief oversight counsel for homeland security. and under then senator sam nunn, he was on the senate subcommittee for investigation staff. he has worked at commerce at the justice department, at the state and federal level and today he is the special inspector general f
CSPAN
Feb 6, 2013 5:00pm EST
of the fact that was used to talk about the king is the fact that he was preventing people from coming to the country and being able to migrate here kyl and then if we look at the statue of liberty to give me your tired in your poor what i don't want people to take away from this hearing is all of a sudden we forgot about the tide of the poor and the people that are striving for a better life, so those are probably my biggest concerns when we what that he the president we sat and we have economic problems and we are getting out of them like we always do we and we will always prospered because we are resilient. but the question becomes what about the moral ground that we would see if we just said we are going to get about 11 million people and we are only going to focus on skilled workers we are not going to take care of this house and equal protection do you worry about that? >> i do. the fifth thing is our country is in a mess. we have a brain drain but not for the first time in history. it's never happened before. america has been a land. it is happening right now. if we wait to fix
CSPAN
Feb 6, 2013 11:00pm EST
i would estimate probably 40% of our ships are manufactured in the u.s. but we also come into your question, many facts are some in europe, facilities and japan were global manufacturing. >> to be a very small percentage right now. >> 10%? >> significantly less. >> are major components to your industry engaged in manufacturing these types of things in china. >> their other part that manufacture. we appreciate that investment. it says here we have $409 in this type of research going on. does that $400 billion annually, does that calculate with individual inventors put into the mix, or they just not part of the calculation? >> are probably not going to be significant percentage as measured by dollars but about 60% would come from private companies than 40% of the federal funded. >> were talking about private inventors and their impact on new discoveries. how is she placed them in terms of government programs coming up with something new, corporations coming up with something new versus the individual inventor community coming up with something new. >> if you look at the types of recr
CSPAN
Feb 8, 2013 12:00pm EST
if he would start with this one for us. i love this person is campbell. he or she goes by righttobeheard to read talk about why you've chosen to become a leader -- >> we can't hear you. >> you talked a little bit about why you chosen to become a leader of no labels. what will you do to convince the congress to join in as problem solvers? >> i believe there is as many frustrated people in conagra's as i am pittard i believe the 435 majority. when you hear about people making a deal if you hear about john boehner talking to the president or mitch mcconnell talking to the vice president or harry reid, there's a few people at the top trying to make these decisions thinking we should all fall. there's little reach the bottom to find out where we are coming from and it's based on seniority. that hasn't worked well. we haven't been able to fix much with that type of attitude so i know when we reach out and have 25, 30 of us and we are reaching across the aisle malae -- i will give you a perfect example. we had a problem with revenue and people said we don't have a revenue prob
CSPAN
Feb 12, 2013 5:00pm EST
to the sequestration and the year-long continuing resolution threat that looms before us. so that's the best we're going to be able to do this morning. it's the senate -- it's full glur i are. -- glory. >> there are sixteen days remaining between day and march 1st. sixteen days to define the strength for coming decades. they announced last week that he indefinitely delayed the deployment of the truman carrier strike in the middle east. they too carrier force presence our commander in the region is urgently requested over a long period of time admiral, i'm going run through quick, admiral, vice chairman of the joint chief recently made a statement. i want to make sure it gets in the record, quote, i know of no other time in history when we have come potentially down this far this fast in the defense budget. there could be for the first time in my career instances where we may be asked to respond to a crisis and we will have to say that we cannot do it. the secretary of defense and the hearing took place the other day on benghazi made it clear we don't have the assets necessary to carry out some
CSPAN
Feb 17, 2013 10:00pm EST
to move along to get to all the features and get us started what i want to introduce the mastermind of today's event, i've learned today one of four curators of photography and i am sure they're all here. it is my pleasure to turn the program over to verna curtis. [applause] >> thank you very much, we're all in this together. i am not the mastermind. we have brigitte freed the widow of the photographer of the book "this is the day" the march on washington" which we are celebrating. the also have michael eric dyson and paul farber here with us for a special kind of conversation. i will tell you about each individual quickly because time is of the essence and i would like to tell you brigitte freed said she met leonard freed 1956 in rome and lived and varied in amsterdam when they left for the united states in 1963 a few months before that would be the march on washington. i don't think they knew that was about to happen. she printed leonard's photographs over 20 years including those in the book black and white america and made in germany and the internationally acclaimed exhibitions
CSPAN
Feb 19, 2013 3:00am EST
next year. but i would like for us to pause tonight and think more deeply about the meaning of dr. king's life and his legacy and what it has to teach us about our nation's president. it seems particularly important for us to do that given that this year marks the 50th anniversary of the march on washington. 50 years have passed since his voice soared over the washington monument, declaring his dream "i have a dream. it is a dream deeply rooted in the american dream." yesterday while i was watching president obama's inaugural address, i heard echoes of king's speech i have a dream. and when i turn off my television set, i spent a few minutes reflecting on the question are all of us truly welcome to share in this dream come the same dream that dr. king dreamed? most americans i am sure can be cite portions of dr. king's i have a dream speech by heart. it's an extraordinary and very familiar speech i've grown accustomed to hearing clips of his speech played over and over are cycled over and over on the radio every january. they are the favorite quotes, the favorite lines. and now that i h
CSPAN
Feb 1, 2013 5:00pm EST
of the measures used to assess the retirement savings progress. we found that a simple to understand savings target is a framework that resonates with workers and employers and we believe this approach would be helpful for people who switch jobs frequently and who may have a number of retirement accounts making it even more difficult to evaluate one saving strategy. in closing, there is a path to retirement security for most americans. the road is and always an easy one. many constituencies have a role for insuring success. first, workers need to take an active role in saving and managing for their financial future. employers need more flexibility and the rules and regulation to design benefit plans which meet the diverse needs of their work force without the fiduciary liability and increased coverage cost. third service providers like fidelity need to continue to innovate around how to help plan sponsors optimize their benefit programs and service participants based on their needs. last, we ask policy makers to consider a variety of ideas to improve the retirement savings outcomes. examples
CSPAN
Feb 4, 2013 12:00am EST
. when i was a child in richm richmond,on virginia, this phrase that we used all the time. from here to timbuktu. but, nobody knew what timbucktoo was. nobody knew the meaning of the word. didn't know where it was and didn't even know it was a place. timbucktoo of course was a crossroads of commerce but it was also a site the site of one of the world's first universities of san kora which was built before the blackmore's ilk the first university in spain at sala make a and 7-eleven a.d.. and so still in timbuktu you have all of these manuscripts written between five a.d. and 15 a.d., literature and support manuscripts of the highest quality written by african and arab scholars. and we knew nothing about it. we didn't know anything about the queen of sheba who is described by this claim of sheba. she. she lived all of her life and ox him which is approximately where it ethiopia is today. that sheba was and what is now yemen, but it was shortened to the queen of sheba. but the bible describes her as a woman of blacks can but in the movie it was played by gina lola bridget and sell all
CSPAN
Feb 14, 2013 8:00pm EST
to be commander u.s. central command and general david rodriguez u.s. army to be nominated to be commander of the u.s. africa command. these two combatant commands centcom and africom are the centers of gravity for our military's operations to counter the threat of terrorism. oath nominees have served our country with distinction and i want to thank each of you for your decades of military service and your willingness to serve once again. i understand that general austin 's wife charlene and general rodriguez' wife jen air with us this morning and i want to a knowledge them and thank them for their sacrifices, their support to our nominees throughout the years which is so essential to the success of our nominees and as is the committee's tradition are nominees are invited to introduce any family members or friends who may be with them this morning with their opening remarks. if confirmed general austin will assume command of centcom during it critical transition. not for military operations in afghanistan. in the coming months afghan forces will assume the lead responsibility for providing
CSPAN
Feb 22, 2013 12:00pm EST
assessment tool that is available for folks to use. you can use it on your own and we will walk through it with you. the threat information is an area that folks look to the government and tell us what the threat is. we do a lot of briefings for the critical infrastructure sectors principally for the court making capital and also courtesy io. but increasingly in the cyber arena, the private sector has traffic information and we see this in the report that was released this week from the private sector we saw this last year from the think tank of in canada and there is a lot of good information out there about the nature of the threat and a lot of good information in the private sector about the specific signature information and indicators made for collaboration not only looking to the government solution. on vulnerability, the private sector owners and operators understand you understand your vulnerabilities better than anyone. so what we bring to this partnership is again these tools that take that data and make sense of it and the ip has developed tools that not only help you do an a
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